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Journal of Clinical and Applied Neurosciences                            Volume 2; Issue 1                                   Jan-Jun 2017
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Risk Factors Associated with Second and Subsequent Strokes in an Adult Stroke Population in a Rural Community in South-East Nigeria
Kelechi O ENWEREJI1, Maduaburochukwu C NWOSU1, Adesola OGUNNIYI2,
Paul O NWANI1, Azuoma L ASOMUGHA1, Ezinna E ENWEREJI3


AFFILIATIONS
1Neurology Unit, Dept of Medicine, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital
Nnewi, Anambra State NIGERIA
2Neurology Unit, Dept of Medicine, University College Hospital Ibadan Oyo State NIGERIA
3Dept of Community Medicine / Nursing Sciences, College of Medicine, Abia State University, Uturu, Abia State NIGERIA

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Kelechi O ENWEREJI
Neurology Unit, Department of Medicine, Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital Nnewi, Anambra State NIGERIA

Email: doublekay2001@yahoo.com <mailto:doublekay2001@yahoo.com>
Phone: +234 803 386 1317

DISCLOSURES:
No disclosures.

Received: 30th May, 2017
Accepted: 29th June, 2017
ABSTRACT

Background:
Stroke, and by extrapolation, recurrent stroke is estimated to constitute an enormous burden in Sub-Saharan Africa. This is believed to stem from the ever increasing burden of the risk factors for stroke in our population.
Objective: To determine the specific risk factors for stroke and recurrent stroke in an adult stroke population in a rural community in South-East, Nigeria.
Methodology: We carried out a case-controlled analytical cross sectional study on an adult stroke population screened out from a predominantly low-income community in South-East Nigeria. We used a pre-tested Risk Factor for Stroke/Recurrent Stroke Questionnaire, focused clinical examination and collected blood samples for laboratory investigations.
Results: We identified 10 stroke subjects out of which 3 had recurrent stroke. Furthermore, 10 age- and sex-matched controls were randomly selected from the stroke negative population. All the stroke subjects were hypertensive in contradistinction to the controls (10 subjects vs 2 controls respectively, p=0.001). The association between the other risk factors (diabetes mellitus and tobacco use) and the number of stroke risk factors present in an individual was less significant for stroke than for recurrent stroke.
Conclusion: Hypertension was identified as the most frequent risk factor associated with stroke and recurrent stroke, in the study. This is comparable with other local and international studies.

Keywords:
Africa, developing country, population screening, recurrent stroke, risk variables