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Journal of Clinical and Applied Neurosciences                            Volume 1; Issue 1                                   Jan-Jun 2015
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Frequency and correlates of perceived stigma in a sample of Nigerian people with epilepsy
Michael B FAWALE1, Mayowa O OWOLABI2, Adekunle F MUSTAPHA3,
Morenikeji A KOMOLAFE
1, Adesola OGUNNIYI2


AFFILIATIONS
1 Neurology Unit
Department of Medicine
College of Health Sciences
Obafemi Awolowo University
Ile-Ife, NIGERIA
2 Neurology Unit
Department of Medicine
College of Medicine
University of Ibadan
Ibadan, NIGERIA
3 Neurology Unit
Department of Medicine
College of Health Sciences
Ladoke Akintola University of
Technology, Osogbo, NIGERIA

CORRESPONDING AUTHOR

Michael B FAWALE
Department of Medicine
Faculty of Clinical Sciences
College of Health Sciences
Obafemi Awolowo University
Ile-Ife, NIGERIA
Phone: +234 706 509 3947
Email: bimbofawale@yahoo.com


DISCLOSURES: NONE
ABSTRACT
Background: Adults with epilepsy face a lot of stigma in the various Nigerian settings, mostly based on wrong assumptions on the disease.
Objective: To determine the frequency of perceived stigma and to identify the sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with perceived stigma among adults with epilepsy.
Methodology: The 3-item epilepsy stigma scale was completed by 99 adults with confirmed diagnosis of epilepsy. Socio-demographic and clinical details were, also, obtained.
Results: A total of 99 adults (58 males, 41 females) were recruited for the study. The frequency of perceived stigma was 51 (51.5%) of which, 28 (28.3%) felt severely stigmatized by the disease while 13.1% and 10.1% reported low and moderate levels of perceived stigma, respectively. Logistic regression analysis identified time-to-antiepileptic-drug-treatment and number of AEDs as independently associated with perceived stigma.
Conclusions: The frequency of perceived stigma among our adults with epilepsy is high. Delayed time to AED treatment and number of AEDs may be important correlates of perceived stigma in adults with epilepsy. Further studies are required to ascertain the differential effects of these factors on perceived stigma while controlling for potential psychiatric comorbidities.

Keywords: Acts of discrimination, anti-epileptic drugs, time to treatment, sub- Saharan Africa



Received: 22nd January, 2015                                                                   Accepted: 15th February, 2014